Home About HyMeX
Motivations
Science questions
Observation strategy
Modelling strategy
Target areas
Key documents
Organisation
International coordination
Working groups
Task teams
National contributions
Endorsements
Resources
Database
Data policy
Publications
Education and summer schools
Drifting balloons (BAMED)
SOP web page
Google maps data visualisation
Workshops Projects
ASICS-MED
MOBICLIMEX
MUSIC
IODA-MED
REMEMBER
FLOODSCALE
EXAEDRE
Offers Links Contacts
Science & Task teams
Science teams
Task teams
Implementation plan
Coordination
International Scientific Steering Committee (ISSC)
Executive Committee for Implementation and Science Coordination (EC-ISC)
Executive Committee - France (EC-Fr)
HyMeX France
HyMeX Italy
HyMeX Spain
Archive
by Ferron, B., Bouruet Aubertot, P., Cuypers, Y., Schroeder, K. and Borghini, M.
Abstract:
The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy ε and the associated diapycnal turbulent mixing is inferred from a set of microstructure observations collected over several cruises from year 2012 to 2014. The geographical distribution of ε highlights several regions of enhanced levels of turbulence ranging from 10−9 to 10−6 W kg−1: the Sicily Channel, the Corsica Channel, and the Ligurian Sea. Elsewhere, ε was small, often below 10−10 W kg−1. Below 1300 m, geothermal heating provides three-fold more buoyancy than small-scale turbulence. Geothermal heating and turbulent diffusion provide enough buoyancy to balance 15\% to 50\% of a mean yearly deep water formation rate of 0.9 to 0.3 sverdrup (106 m3/s), respectively. The remaining part has to eventually overflow through the Strait of Gibraltar.
Reference:
Ferron, B., Bouruet Aubertot, P., Cuypers, Y., Schroeder, K. and Borghini, M., 2017: How important are diapycnal mixing and geothermal heating for the deep circulation of the Western Mediterranean?Geophysical Research Letters, 44, 7845-7854.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{Ferron2017,
  Title                    = {How important are diapycnal mixing and geothermal heating for the deep circulation of the Western Mediterranean?},
  Author                   = {Ferron, B. and Bouruet Aubertot, P. and Cuypers, Y. and Schroeder, K. and Borghini, M.},
  Journal                  = {Geophysical Research Letters},
  Year                     = {2017},

  Month                    = {August},
  Number                   = {15},
  Pages                    = {7845-7854},
  Volume                   = {44},

  Abstract                 = {The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy ε and the associated diapycnal turbulent mixing is inferred from a set of microstructure observations collected over several cruises from year 2012 to 2014. The geographical distribution of ε highlights several regions of enhanced levels of turbulence ranging from 10−9 to 10−6 W kg−1: the Sicily Channel, the Corsica Channel, and the Ligurian Sea. Elsewhere, ε was small, often below 10−10 W kg−1. Below 1300 m, geothermal heating provides three-fold more buoyancy than small-scale turbulence. Geothermal heating and turbulent diffusion provide enough buoyancy to balance 15\% to 50\% of a mean yearly deep water formation rate of 0.9 to 0.3 sverdrup (106 m3/s), respectively. The remaining part has to eventually overflow through the Strait of Gibraltar.},
  Copublication            = {3 Fr, 2 It},
  Doi                      = {10.1002/2017GL074169},
  Eprint                   = {https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/2017GL074169},
  Keywords                 = {turbulent mixing; microstructure; overturning circulation; geothermal heating; Mediterranean Sea; thermohaline circulation;},
  Owner                    = {hymexw},
  Timestamp                = {2018.11.30},
  Url                      = {https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/2017GL074169}
}